Borders and Partitions : Exception as Space and Time

ˇ@

ˇ@

Rada Ivekovic

ˇ@

     It was comfortable once to think of exception as being just exception, or as partition being un abnormal ˇ§eventˇ¨. But what if partitioning were the very dynamics of the state and of  intra- and international tensions? As many nowadays study the phenomenon of exception becoming the rule, we might ask about the effects of exception when shifted in time or displaced : in many ways, the exception has always been the rule, but not always for "us". The exception was then what applied to others at other times, and elsewhere. We discover a shifting subject as to the concept of exception, which is always an exception regarding someone. The exception is the remote, the other. That which is seen as "normalcy" in one place, is the "exception" elsewhere: for example, Westerners often think that castes in India are an "exception" to some [Western, but really « universal »] normalcy, which also means that they imagine them as added to society. The idea is that, once you ˇ§removeˇ¨ caste, there remains a ˇ§normalˇ¨ Western-like society (ˇ§castelessˇ¨). For example, an oppressive hierarchy may be so deeply embedded in tradition that it becomes part of ordinary common sense. Thus endemic and extreme violence can both be integrated into normal life. Also, there is nothing new in the generalisation of exception : it was always there for example in colonialism. However an exception is necessarily limited not only in space, but also in time.

ˇ@

ˇ@

ˇ@

 

ˇ@

 

 

 

 

 

ˇ@